Sister Loc Extensions

I came,
I saw,
I conquered!

Yes!! Yessss!! Well, not quite, lol but that’s how I feel about my new do!! These are loc extensions below. I attempted to do Sister loc extensions and this was the outcome.

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I challenged myself often when it comes to my own hair. I like to be creative and different and standing out with my looks. I have a strong sense of determination when it comes to trying new hairstyles. And when I set my mind on doing something, I get it done.

These Sister locs took the weekend to complete to entire process which includes washing and moisturizing my hair and pre-twisting it to prepare it for the locs. This is my second time doing loc extensions so I knew what to expect and how to prepare for them Here is what I used:

3 packs of Marley hair (I used 2.5)
Scissors

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..Yup, that’s it. That’s all I needed this time. Last time I did my loc extensions, they were long and very heavy and required about 8 packs of Marley hair. The difference between then and now is that I didn’t add Marley hair to my pre-twists.

So, here are the specs..

I used a color 27 Marley braid hair for each twist. Then, half way through, I discovered some bleach blonde kinky hair in my hair closet. I added some of those strands to twist the front for highlights. (I was super excited to find this because I didn’t think I had any left). It’s hard to find this color in beauty supply store nowadays. I’ve had this left over hair since high school days!

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Old Left over Blonde hair | Color 27 Marley hair

The ENTIRE process took the ENTIRE weekend. I took down my Havana Twists and washed my hair on Friday after getting caught in a downpour, which was quite fine because I was going to wash my hair that day anyway. I used Kinky Curly Come Clean to cleanse and Shea Moisture Deep Treatment to condition. I dried my hair in an old tee-shirt (to reduce frizziness/smooth hair cuticle and reduce chances of breakage). Then I moisturized my hair using the LOC method. LOC stands for liquid, oil, cream. This ensure that one seals in moisture within the strands of the hair.

Here’s my interpretation of the LOC method:

The liquid (L) is usually water (damp hair) and/or a leave-in conditioner (for those with thirsty hair)
My hair was damp and I added a combination of some of my favorite leave-ins: Shea Moisture Balancing Conditioner (technically not a leave-in) and Curl Junkie Smoothing Lotion
The oil (O) is any essential oil of your choice
I used Jojoba oil, and Nubian Heritage Grow and Strengthening Serum
The cream (C) can be any butter like Shea or Mango butter (or even a leave-in cream for those with not-so-thirsty hair)
I used Shea butter as my sealant. She is more than enough for my thirsty hair. It keeps it soft.

But I digress,

After moisturizing, I two-strand twisted my hair into very small twists. This took 5 hours on Friday.
Saturday, I began the locs. (there are a lot of YouTube how-to’s on loc extensions if you need a visual on how to start them) I took a strand of Marley hair and split it in half. (A whole strand isn’t needed to coil and cover your hair, also more hair creates bulk and heaviness). I held a part of the Marley hair with my own hair and wrapped the other part of the hair around it tightly in a coil all the way to the ends which then I folded on itself after reaching the desired length. I wrapped it upward until it disappeared. I did it this way so I did not have to burn my ends nor dip it in hot water. I wanted to avoid that because my actual hair lied only a few inched beneath the locs and I wouldn’t want to miss and burn my hair with fire or hot water. Also, burning the hair makes the ends hard and it pulls on clothing or scratch the skin. I find that to be unpleasant.
I completed a little over half of my hair on Saturday. This took about 12 hours.
Sunday, I finished the remainder of my hair. This took about 2 hours.

In total, it took just under 20 hours to complete.

Given that these loc extensions are much smaller, it was a major challenge, especially because I did it on my own head. On Saturday, my pace became slower during the latter of the 12 hours because I was super tired. I ended up straining my shoulder with the constant repetitive movement of my arm while coiling the hair around mine. Also, my wrists and fingers are tight and sore. So, with the pain I went through for this and the time invested, I have no choice but to MAKE SURE that this style lasts me 6 weeks. No excuses.

Overall, I am very satisfied with the outcome of my sister loc extensions! They are short, small, and very light this time around. Any thoughts or questions you have about these, please comment below. 🙂

I will post more pictures later! Stay tuned!

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Carnival Sunday!

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Carnival in the Air!

Yesterday, I attended the annual Caribbean Carnival in my town. It was a beautiful and sunny day with a cold breeze at times. Overall, the carnival was cool; it had fewer attendees this year, probably due to the fact that it was football Sunday. However, it was drama-free for the most part and diverse with all types of people, old and young, and different cultures and ethnicities apart from the Caribbean Islanders. I had a great time!

I rocked my Havana twists in a neat high bun. The night before, I redid the twists at the front so that my hairstyle would appear fresh. I used Garnier Fructis Pure Clean Smoothing Cream to reduce the frizziness while retwisting. Then I used ORS edge control on my edges in the front and the back. I tied down the perimeter of my hair with a scarf and put a bonnet over my bun. In the morning, I took off the hair ties and my hairstyle looked freshly done.

I am currently at the start of week 3 wearing my medium Havana twists. I think this entire week, I will keep my hair bunned. See pictures below from my awesome fun-day-Sunday with my naturally awesome curly fashionista friend Kay Mae! I love her style by the way–she is a trendy, edgy, and unique fashionista. Hopefully, she will start a blog displaying her fashion style, tips soon! If and when she does, I’ll be sure to let y’all know! Oh, and if you’re wondering about the cute and flirty little yellow dress that I’m wearing, check it out on my Fashion Finds page for more details!

Havana vs. Marley: Care to know the difference?

Recently, twists have gained popularity among naturals as a great protective style alternative to braids. They are versatile, feminine and cute! So far, there are three types of twists and they are:

Havana Twists
Marley Twists (also known as Kinky Twists)
Senegalese Twists (also known as Rope Twists)

Senegalese twists (Rope twists) are easily recognizable by their long, skinny, and shiny construct. They are the only twists (so far) created with kanekalon fibers/synthetic straight hair which easily sets it apart from Marley and Havana twists.

Now, Marley twists and Havana twists are similar but not the same. Both looks can be created using Marley braid hair/kinky hair. Additionally, “Havana hair by Finger Comber” has come about more recently, specifically for creating Havana twists. I’ve never tried “Havana hair,” but supposedly it is softer than Marley/Kinky hair. I use Marley/Kinky hair to do both Marley twists and Havana twists because it’s easily accessible at my local beauty supply store for $4.99/per pack (as opposed to Havana hair available online priced at $12.99/per pack) and I’ve never had any objections to using this type of synthetic hair for either style.

So whats the real difference between Havana and Marley twists?

Havana twists

Ideally have chunky sections/parts
Appear loosely twisted
Uses a generous amount of strands (typically 3-5) per twist depending on desired look
Has invisible/undetectable roots (where the beginning of the twist meet your hair).

Marley twists (Kinky Twists)

Smaller sections/parts
Tighter twists
Uses fewer strands (typically 1-2) per twist
No invisible roots (braided for about an inch then twist)

Nowadays, a lot of people are using the style names Havana twists and Marley twists interchangeably, deeming them the same. Also to add to the confusion, people have been combining the two styles for a desired look (e.g: smaller Havana twists instead of chunky Havana twists or Marley twists (reminder: tightly twisted) with invisible roots). This would surely cause confusion, especially for those cannot see or tell the difference easily.

It seems as though hairstyles are evolving and remixing off of one another. I see no problem with that. Quite frankly, I think it’s great because then more styles are added to the “Encyclopedia of Protective Styles” for us naturals to pick up on and try out ourselves!” And to each is own–everyone has different variations of styles that suits their needs. For example, I prefer small/medium Havana twists over the “original” chunky twists. So, hopefully, this clarification can help us use the correct terminology in the meantime to address each style as they are currently.  Who knows, something totally new might evolve from these two or three types of twists. Let’s wait and see! 🙂